Fujitsu's LifeBook SH760 has a brilliant keyboard, strong build quality and great performance

Recommended
Fujitsu's LifeBook SH760 has a brilliant keyboard, strong build quality and great performance
Rating
Overall:

A premium laptop with a decidedly budget appearance, but fortunately, appearances can be deceiving

Performance:
5
Features & Design:
4
Value for money:
5
Price
Price: $2066
> Pricing info
Specs
Price 2066
CPU model/brand Intel Core i7- 620M
CPU speed 2.67Ghz
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At first glance, you might mistake the Fujitsu SH760 for an HP ProBook: the two share a certain square and blocky piano black styling that suggests a low price point.

But a quick glance at the specs confirms that this is an i7 laptop with a Core i7-860 inside, and even a dedicated graphics card. The business looks are a bit of camouflage for any exec who wants something a bit snazzy to lug around the office.

With an i7 inside, you might wonder who Fujitsu considers the audience for this laptop. There's power under the hood, but this is far from a gaming laptop. Its main strength is in multi-tasking, but it also doubles as a comfortably capable business PC.

The closest competitor in that sphere is the Lenovo T410, now also sporting a Core i7 processor, which stood out for its comfortable keypad, excellent screen and light weight, with battery life that didn't skimp.

In terms of build quality, you couldn't ask for more. The lid flexes immensely, but you at least get the impression it's designed to do so, and the screen stands up to the punishment we meted out without a whimper.

The chassis is solid and reassuring, able to withstand the rigours of long distance travel and commute alike. The laptop is remarkably lightweight, too - at just 1.6kg, and only 32mm thick, it's beautifully portable.

The 13.3in, 1366 x 768 LED LCD screen is fantastically bright - we turned down the brightness level while using it indoors because we didn't need the extra oomph.

And it's not just bright, but provides good colour - images are clear and vivid, with good detail and contrast. LED can have a tendency to look slightly washed out, but that's not the case here, and text is crisp and clear. That screen really helps, in fact, adding a level of easy readability to text that provides additional comfort for long hours at the keyboard.

And long hours at the SH760 are made possible by the incredibly responsive keyboard. There's fantastic bounce after each keystroke, giving the kind of effortless touchtyping that you normally expect to find only at a desktop. The textured trackpad doesn't get in the way of typing, and is as responsive and precise as you could desire.

In addition to the usual trackpad, Fujitsu has also added a novel scroll wheel alongside it. This small round trackpad-like area lets you quickly move up and down a webpage, for example, and while its a departure from the two finger scroll we usually see, it takes virtually no getting used to and works well. It takes up valuable wristrest real estate, but it didn't get in the way of typing.

The 2.67GHz Intel Core i7-620M is a speedy mobile processor, and in our application benchmarks its score of 1.47 shows that it has the performance chops to handle all the multitasking you could throw at it.

While business users aren't likely to be seeking gaming power, video conferencing has become a standard part of life, and a laptop that copes ably with video while tackling other tasks is advantageous.

The dedicated graphics card produced 46fps in our low settings Crysis benchmark - that's a credit to the G310M GPU, a rebadged G210M, and the addition of an HDMI port means that the screen can be output to an LCD monitor for easier video conferencing, should you need it.

If you'd rather use it for HD video, the graphics card is more than capable. For business users too, the security aspects are pleasing, including a fingerprint reader and TPM, joined by BIOS lock and hard disk lock. 

We've compared the Fujitsu SH760 to the Lenovo Thinkpad 410, but it's not a fair competition. The Lenovo 410 is around $400 cheaper than the Fujitsu, but right now, the Core i7 processor gives the Fujitsu the edge. With the impeccable usability and screen quality of the Fujitsu, the Lenovo could find it hard to match.

This Review appeared in the May, 2010 issue of PC & Tech Authority Magazine

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See more about:  fujitsu  |  lifebook  |  sh760  |  laptop  |  notebook  |  netbook
 
 

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