Facebook flotation set for May

Facebook flotation set for May

The social networking site could be gearing up for a $100bn IPO to get some cash in the coffers

facebook IPO $100bn flotation stock mark zuckerburg Facebook could make an initial public offering (IPO) by the end of May, if AllThingD's sources are to be believed – and they usually are.

And with estimates that the social network is worth US$100bn at the last count, it'd be the biggest flotation tech has ever seen. So understandably investment geeks are getting excited.

As it's rumoured to already have racked up over 500 investors, Facebook might have to start talking numbers anyway – but an IPO has been on the cards since 2011 so it's ever so slightly overdue.

There'll be fun for us too as if Facebook goes ahead with the flotation – the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) will want to know the ins and outs of the site's secret finances.

That means Facebook users could soon see how much moolah Zuckerberg is making off your drunken photos and ten-a-day 'Like' habit.

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