The first thing you notice is the stock presentation. You walk into an average PC store in Australia and, depending on size, you either get an ugly, seething mass of product jamming every shelf, or you get huge open spaces with almost no product in it at all. If you’re lucky, you get a few display cases with a few motherboards or other expensive items in there. 

This is clearly not the case here. Like most places in Japan, computer shops pride themselves on their space-efficient (it’s a small country) and beautiful stock presentation. Note the rows of perfectly stacked and laid-out motherboards. You may be able to see at the top of the photo they have lovely Perspex cases to show off the newest or most expensive mobos, too.
 

The first thing you notice is the stock presentation. You walk into an average PC store in Australia and, depending on size, you either get an ugly, seething mass of product jamming every shelf, or you get huge open spaces with almost no product in it at all. If you’re lucky, you get a few display cases with a few motherboards or other expensive items in there. This is clearly not the case here. Like most places in Japan, computer shops pride themselves on their space-efficient (it’s a small country) and beautiful stock presentation. Note the rows of perfectly stacked and laid-out motherboards. You may be able to see at the top of the photo they have lovely Perspex cases to show off the newest or most expensive mobos, too.

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In pictures: Inside a Japanese PC shop

Within only a couple of square kilometres of JR Akihabara station, there are about 80 (!) PC shops. Chris Nicholls was there earlier this year and took these photos for us.

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